Tensions between the past and the now… Or, well: lakes in Berlin!

Sometimes, I feel this tension between the past and the now: between the imagination and the experience. Between the feeling that you feel and understand history… and the moment that you grab your camera to proof it & share it with the blogosphere. Walking around town for all this history, I’ve also happened to run into astonishing places that were not of any use for this blog. It couldn’t help me from using my camera and enjoying the view a second time, now at home. I don’t see a reason not to reveal these during summer-time, when digital visitors may be eager to look for analogue inspiration and cool off at some lake. If you’re asking for my personal favorite: that is definitely be the Liepnitzsee with its blue water. I’ve spend a great summer-day there – albeit without a camera.

View over the Mueggelsee. May 2014, photo by Joep de Visser.

View over the Greenwichpromenade at Tegeler See. November 2013, photo by Joep de Visser.The Bay at Schildhorn a.d. Havel. June 2013, photo by Joep de Visser.

Winter Wonderland at the Lehnitzsee. Oranienburg, February 2013. Photo by Joep de Visser.

View over the Glienicker Bruecke. November 2012, photo by Joep de Visser.

Capturing changes and… Or, well: view over Berlin!

Now I’m having a camera for about two years, I noticed that it is a great tool to immortalise the city & to capture all kinds off changes. When I started this blog, I set myself the goal to prove that the capital of the 20th century has more that’s worth paying a visit to than only the Fernsehturm and other tourist eternities. Now that I’ve made my walk around here, I turned into a full admirer of the socialist disco ball after all. The last photo here shows that – even when you’re 20 kilometers southeast, the St. Walter is still shining for you. The city may be changing – so did I.

View from the Boesebruecke. April 2013. Photo by Joep de Visser.

A view over the city. From Tempelhof. June 2014, photo by Joep de Visser.

View over Goerlitzer Park and Berlin. May 2013. Photo by Joep de Visser.

View over the city. Seen from the Mueggelturm. May 2014, photo by Joep de Visser.

Hans Heinrich Müller’s architectural work in Rummelsburg & Oberschöneweide

In this mini-series, I gather photos of the architecture made by Hans Heinrich Müller (1879-1951). The work of this man is too forgotten, although he was the mastermind behind dozens of Electricity Stations which were constructed in Berlin’s 1920s and early 1930s. This may be my last post about his work! With this 13th post, I’ve taken photos of 34 creations. Now, I can’t find anymore of his buildings! Only a few have been destructed by the Nazi’s for megalomanic urban planning – or were bombed during the war. Another couple of buildings are hard to find & in too far districts to take the risk of going there without success. However, in my first post – I told you that “when you keep an eye to the ornaments, one will find these details back in his later work”. This moment is now! The octogram, also seen on (for example) the Gemeindedoppelschule (1909) and the Umspannwerk Koppenplatz (1926), is back again!

Kraftwerk Rummelsburg (1925 till ±1935, various expansions)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Kraftwerk Rummelsburg. Front-side. (Berlin-Rummelsburg, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Kraftwerk Rummelsburg. Front-side's details. (Berlin-Rummelsburg, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Kraftwerk Rummelsburg. Seen front the Rummelsburger Landstraße. (Berlin-Rummelsburg, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Kraftwerk Rummelsburg. Seen front the Rummelsburger Landstraße. (Berlin-Rummelsburg, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser.)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Kraftwerk Rummelsburg. Machine house. (Berlin-Rummelsburg, photo from 1928)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Kraftwerk Rummelsburg. Berlin-Rummelsburg, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser.Hans Heinrich Müller's Kraftwerk Rummelsburg. (Berlin-Rummelsburg, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)Hans Heinrich Müller's Kraftwerk Rummelsburg. Details. (Berlin-Rummelsburg, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)Hans Heinrich Müller's Kraftwerk Rummelsburg. Details. (Berlin-Rummelsburg, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser.)Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Rummelsburg. Front-Side. March 2014, photo by Joep de Visser.

Hans Heinrich Müller's Kraftwerk Rummelsburg. Seen from the other side of the Spree. (Berlin-Treptow, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)
Umspannwerk Oberschöneweide (1933)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk, Wilhelminenhofstraße (Berlin-Oberschöneweide, 1933)

 Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk, Wilhelminenhofstraße. (Berlin-Oberschöneweide, June 2014)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Oberspree. (Berlin-Oberschöneweide. June 2014, photo by Joep de Visser)

 Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Oberspree, side-view. (Berlin-Oberschöneweide. June 2014, photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Oberspree. (Berlin-Oberschöneweide. June 2014, photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Oberspree, backside (Berlin-Oberschöneweide. June 2014, photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Oberspree. Details inside of the nowadays Werkstatte.(Berlin-Oberschöneweide. June 2014, photo by Joep de Visser)Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Oberspree. Details at the staircase. (Berlin-Oberschöneweide. June 2014, photo by Joep de Visser)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Oberspree. Details at the staircase. (Berlin-Oberschöneweide. June 2014, photo by Joep de Visser) Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Oberspree. Details (Berlin-Oberschöneweide. June 2014, photo by Joep de Visser)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now, when a German’s career comes to an end in the year of 1933 – alarm bells start ringing. What did the Nazi’s do to him after Hitler took power in January that year? After the enormous productive years Müller had, the nose-dive after 1933 is utterly remarkable. It looks like some party had an intention. Now, was his marriage with the daughter of a former well-known communist already enough to be boycotted? Or did the Nazi’s simply favoured different architecture, which meant a ‘natural death’ for Müller’s work? Perhaps, Müller had the intention not to contribute to the Nazi Empire. In addition regime-change also errorred the professional network of an architect, and Müller may not be bothered in restoring these. It’s proven that in stead of semi-public factories, Müller only build private houses. On the other hand, in 1937/8 – Müller participated in an architectural competition for the Hochschulstadt: a Nazi military school located at the nowadays Teufelsberg. Although Müller didn’t got the assignment, it implies that he didn’t boycott the Nazi’s after all. All summed up, it’s unsure why Müller was not that active as a public architect anymore after 1933. Some party may have had an intention once, but maybe it is coincidence after all…

Hans Heinrich Müller’s “Gleichrichterwerke”

In this series, I gather photos of the architecture made by Hans Heinrich Müller (1879-1951). The work of this man is too forgotten, although he was the mastermind behind dozens of Electricity Stations which were constructed in the 1920s and early 1930s. The Gleichrichterwerke have an other function than all buildings I’ve blogged before. These buildings had to convert the voltage into electricity. Although I could only find two of them in the whole city, I think that these Gleichrichterwerke had to right to be in the series about Müller’s electricity buildings as well. Here is my fore-last update!

Gleichrichterwerk Niederschönhausen (1928)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Gleichrichterwerk Niederschönhausen. Front-side. (Berlin-Pankow, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Gleichrichterwerk Niederschönhausen. (Berlin-Pankow, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser) Hans Heinrich Müller's Gleichrichterwerk Niederschönhausen. Details. (Berlin-Pankow, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser) Hans Heinrich Müller's Gleichrichterwerk Niederschönhausen. Details of the rounded tower. (Berlin-Pankow, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser) Hans Heinrich Müller's Gleichrichterwerk Niederschönhausen. Details (Berlin-Pankow, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)


Gleichrichterwerk Zehlendorf (1928/29)

Gleichrichterwerk Zehlendorf. (Berlin-Zehlendorf, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Gleichrichterwerk Zehlendorf (Berlin-Zehlendorf, late 1920s)Gleichrichterwerk Zehlendorf. Backside. (Berlin-Zehlendorf, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller’s Electricity Stations in the Berlin districts of Wittenau, Reinickendorf and Spandau

In this mini-series, I gather photos of the architecture made by Hans Heinrich Müller (1879-1951). The work of this man is too forgotten, although he was the mastermind behind dozens of Electricity Stations which were constructed in the 1920s and early 1930s. Müller’s usage of red bricks in odd shapes and eccentric ornaments are somewhat mesmerising and have something magic. Architects could talk for hours and hours about his work, but I’m not an architect. For me, Hans Müller’s constructions are just very aesthetic. Alright – I’ve had enough of talking, ready to picture these brick-stone beauties!


Umspannwerk Wittenau (1925/26)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Wittenau. Backside. (Berlin-Wittenau, photo from the 1920s)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Wittenau. Streetsight. (Berlin-Wittenau, 1925)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Wittenau. Front-side. (Berlin-Reinickendorf, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Wittenau. (Berlin-Reinickendorf, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Wittenau. Details. (Berlin-Reinickendorf, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)


Umspannwerk Umklei (1928/29)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Abspannwerk Uklei (Berlin-Reinickendorf, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Uklei. (Berlin-Spandau, photo from 1963)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Abspannwerk Uklei. The side. (Berlin-Reinickendorf, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Uklei (Berlin-Spandau, photo from 1963)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Abspannwerk Uklei. Doors at the side. (Berlin-Reinickendorf, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser) Hans Heinrich Müller's Abspannwerk Uklei. Details at the backside. (Berlin-Reinickendorf, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser) Hans Heinrich Müller's Abspannwerk Uklei. Details at the backside (Berlin-Reinickendorf, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller’s constructions in Berlin-Wedding.

In this mini-series, I gather photos of the architecture made by Hans Heinrich Müller (1879-1951). The work of this man is too forgotten, although he was the mastermind behind dozens of Electricity Stations which were constructed in the 1920s and early 1930s. This has been his contribution to the district of Wedding!

Stützpunkt Christiana (1927/28)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Stützpunkt Christiana, Berlin-Wedding. (March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser) Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Christiana. (Berlin-Wedding, 1927-28)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Stützpunkt Christiana, Berlin-Wedding. (March 2014, photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Stützpunkt Christiana, Berlin-Wedding. Details at the roof. (March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Stützpunkt Christiana, Berlin-Wedding. 'BEWAG'. (March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)Hans Heinrich Müller's Stützpunkt Christiana, Berlin-Wedding. Staircase. (March 2014, photo by Joep de Visser)


Umspannwerk Scharnhorst (1927-29)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Scharnhorst (Berlin-Wedding, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Scharnhorst. Backside. (Berlin-Wedding, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser) Hans Heinrich Müller's Umspannwerk Scharnhorst. Backside. (Berlin-Wedding, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)

Stützpunkt Brusseler Straße (1928)

Hans Heinrich Müller's Stützpunkt Brusseler Straße. Front-side. (Berlin-Wedding, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser) Hans Heinrich Müller's Stützpunkt Brusseler Straße. Front-side details. (Berlin-Wedding, March 2014. Photo by Joep de Visser)